Tony Booth

Tony Booth bio pic

Tony Booth’s new book, Hitler’s Harlots (HarperCollins 2018), will tell for the first time the true story of the Berlin-based brothel Salon Kitty and what went on between the sheets, behind its closed doors. However, this house of ill repute came with a twist. Butcher of Prague Reinhard Tristan Heydrich said, ‘…In such an atmosphere, the most rigid diplomat might be induced to unbend and reveal useful information’. He was right. The Salon Kitty became his pet project where a beautiful receptive girl could elicit more information out of a man much quicker than any SS or Gestapo torture chamber could achieve.

What fascinates Tony about this story is that in the Salon Kitty the girls, who were SS auxiliaries, used sex as their chosen weapon of war compared with the better known SS units storming their way across Europe. But who were the girls who made up this elite and forgotten SS unit? How did they achieve this? What motivated them to sell their bodies for the Fuehrer? Who were their victims? And what did the Nazi elite uncover to help the war effort.

Hitler’s Harlots will be published by HarperCollins and is Tony’s fourth book. His previous books are:

Cox’s Navy which tells the story of how a West Midlands’ scrap dealer Ernest Cox salvaged the scuttled German fleet in Scapa Flow, Orkney. Not knowing what could not be achieved, led to innovative techniques still in use today in salvage operations such as the Exxon Valdez and the Kursk.

His second book, Admiralty Salvage in Peace & War, shows how those techniques went on to be used to great effect from the First World War, through the Battle of the Atlantic, D-Day right up to the Second Gulf War and beyond.

Tony’s third book Thetis Down exposes the conspiracy theory over the loss of the submarine HMS Thetis in 1939 with the loss of 99 men.

Prior to writing books, Tony developed a solid foundation as a freelance journalist, working for publications such as Flight International, Reuters and several medical magazines.

‘... A newly unearthed official document proves that the Admiralty decided it was more important to save the vessel then 99 men....’ Mail on Sunday

‘Never judge a book by its cover, so the adage goes. [Admiralty Salvage] by Tony Booth is much more of a little gem than its name might suggest. …Within its pages are fascinating stories – invariably untold and most definitely unsung – of bravery above and below the surface from a century of salvage operations.’ Navy News

‘[Cox’s Navy] shows how a salver’s persistence proved the experts wrong. Lloyd’s List